Two little children were sitting by the fire one cold winter's night. All at once they heard a timid knock at the door and one ran to open it. There, outside in the cold and darkness, stood a child with no shoes upon his feet and clad in ... Read more of THE FIRST CHRISTMAS-TREE at Children Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Ferns
Harrowing
Hardy Climbing Vines Ivies
Berries And Small Fruits
Apples
Requisites Of The Home Vegetable Garden
Plant Names.
Plants And The Calendar.
Sacred Plants.
The Maidenhairs


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The Rose: Its General Care And Culture
Planning The Garden
The Wild Garden A Plea For Our Native Plants
Planting The Lawn
Plants For Special Purposes
The Gladiolus
The Winter Garden
Iv. Crops That May Follow Others
Mulching
The Hardy Border








Soil Ingredients







A sufficient quantity of soil constituents should be kept on hand in barrels or covered boxes. Store where they will not dry out. Rich Loam or Rotted Sod. This is the basis of most plant soils. Keep a good supply ahead, that it may be thoroughly decomposed. Sand. What is known as "Builders' Sand," medium, coarse and gritty, is the proper kind. Contrary to some horticultural superstitions, it makes no difference what the color is, "silver" or gray, red, white or yellow. Leaf-mould. Easily procured by scraping aside the top layer near some stone wall or hollow in the woods where leaves collect and rot from year to year. Sphagnum moss is another very valuable accessory. It can be gathered in most swampy places or bought cheaply at the florist's. Peat. Not obtainable in all localities, but it can be bought cheap from florists. Found under mucky bog-swamps but must be thoroughly dried and pulverized before use. Bone meal. This is invaluable for enriching plant soil. (See page 19.) The fine sort, sometimes called bone flour, is the quickest acting. For plants that stay potted for several years, it is best to use about two-thirds of the coarse-ground.





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