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Buddlea
Chrysophyllum Cainito
Polygala Dalmaisiana
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Dracaena Indivisa
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Chervil
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Iris)
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Ipomoea







These beautiful climbing plants are very suitable forcovering trellis-work, or for the pillars or rafters of the stove-house. The seed is generally sown in April on a hotbed or under glass, and the young plants set out in the border of the house in May in light, rich soil. Success is mainly secured by allowing plenty of root-room. The perennial kinds are increased from cuttings taken from the small side-shoots placed in sand in a brisk bottom-heat. If grown in the open they often shed their seed, and come up year after year with but little attention. They make a good contrast to Canariensis. The Ipomoea Horsfalliae, with its bright scarlet flowers, has a lovely appearance, but must be treated as a stove evergreen. This is propagated by layers, or by grafting on some strong-growing kind. It thrives in loam and peat mixed with a little dung, and flowers in July or August. Height, 6 ft. to 10 ft.





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