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Buddlea
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Chervil
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Iris)
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Mustard and Cress







For sowing in the open choose a shady border, makethe surface fine and firm, and water it well before putting down the seed. Let the seed be sown thickly at intervals of seven or fourteen days from March to September. As the Cress does not germinate so quickly as the Mustard, the former should be sown four days before the latter. The seed must not be covered, but simply pressed into the surface of the soil. Keep the ground moist, and cut the crop when the second leaf appears. For winter use it is best sown in boxes and grown in a frame, the seed being covered with flannel kept constantly moist. This may be removed as soon as the seed germinates. Gardeners mostly prefer to grow it through coarse flannel, to avoid the possibility of grit being sent to table. The curled leaf Cress is the best, and the new Chinese Mustard is larger in leaf than the old variety, and is very pungent in flavour.





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