The Story of Mrs. C. Hood: Once upon a time during the Civil War my grandmother was alone with just one old faithful servant. The Union troops had just about taken everything she had, except three prize saddle horses and one coal black mar... Read more of C Hood at Martin Luther King.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Buddlea
Chrysophyllum Cainito
Polygala Dalmaisiana
Sage
Dracaena Indivisa
Guernsey Lily (nerine Sarniense)
Leek
Anise
Rampion
Chervil


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Chervil
Rampion
Fennel
Iris)
Cereus Gigantea
Elaeis Melanococca
Ficus Religiosa
Hartighsea Spectabilis
Hyphaene Thebaica
Ilex Paraguayensis








Ranunculus







These prefer a good stiff, rather moist, but well-drainedloam, enriched with well-rotted cow-dung, and a sunny situation. February is probably the best time for planting, though some prefer to do it in October. Press the tubers (claws downwards) firmly into the soil, placing them 2 or 3 in. deep and 4 or 5 in. apart. Cover them with sand, and then with mould. Water freely in dry weather. Protect during winter with a covering of dry litter, which should be removed in spring before the foliage appears. They flower in May or June. Seeds, selected from the best semi-double varieties, sown early in October and kept growing during the winter, will flower the next season. They may likewise be increased by off-sets and by dividing the root. The claws may be lifted at the end of June and stored in dry sand. The plants are poisonous. Height, 8 in. to 12 in.





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