I have a friend, Olof Ehrensvaerd, a Swede by birth, who yet, by reason of a strange and melancholy mischance of his early boyhood, has thrown his lot with that of the New World. It is a curious story of a headstrong boy and a proud and re... Read more of The Dead Valley at Scary Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Two of the most important points in the sowing of seedare the proper condition of the ground and the regular and uniform depth at which the seed is sown. Seeds require light, heat, air, and moisture for their germination. The ground should be light, and in such a condition that the young roots can easily penetrate it, and in all cases should be freshly dug so as to communicate air and moisture: it should be neither too wet nor too dry. The most favourable time for seed-sowing is just before a gentle rain. If sown too early on cold, wet ground, the seed is apt to rot; when sown too shallow in a dry time, there may not be sufficient moisture to cause it to sprout. The seed should be sown evenly. The size of a seed is a nearly safe guide as to the depth at which it should be sown. For instance, Beans and Peas of all kinds should be sown about a couple of inches deep, while very small flower-seeds merely require to be just covered. As to the time for sowing, see "Annuals," "Biennials," and "Perennials."

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