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Buddlea
Chrysophyllum Cainito
Polygala Dalmaisiana
Sage
Dracaena Indivisa
Guernsey Lily (nerine Sarniense)
Leek
Anise
Rampion
Chervil


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Chervil
Rampion
Fennel
Iris)
Pedilanthus Tithymaloides
Quassia Amara
Selaginella Lepidophylla
Theophrasta Jussiaei
Vanilla Planifolia
Trollius Altaiense (globe Flower)








Asters







This splendid class of half-hardy annuals has been vastlyimproved by both French and German cultivators. Speaking generally, the flowers of the French section resemble the chrysanthemum, and those of the German the paeony. They all delight in a very rich, light soil, and need plenty of room from the commencement of their growth. The first sowing may be made in February or March, on a gentle hotbed, followed by others at about fourteen days' interval. The seeds are best sown in shallow drills and lightly covered with soil, then pressed down by a board. Prick out the seedlings 2 in. apart, and plant them out about the middle of May in a deeply-manured bed. If plant food be given it must be forked in lightly, as the Aster is very shallow-rooting, and it should be discontinued when the buds appear. For exhibition purposes remove the middle bud, mulch the ground with some good rotten soil from an old turf heap, and occasionally give a little manure water.





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